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Search Results Showing Item 7 of 12 Preferred library: Scoville Memorial Library - Salisbury?

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  • 137 of 157 copies available at Bibliomation.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Scoville Memorial Library - Salisbury. (Show preferred library)
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Scoville Memorial Library - Salisbury JFIC PALACIO (Text to phone) 37538125036091 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Ansonia Public Library YA PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 34045117345970 Young Adult Fiction Available -
Ansonia Public Library YA PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 34045120757120 Basement Available -
Ansonia Public Library YA PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 34045120757138 Basement Available -
Babcock Library - Ashford J Pal (Text to phone) 33110140768720 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Beacon Falls Public Library J5 FIC PAL (Text to phone) 33120000362217 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Bentley Memorial Library - Bolton J FIC Pal Wonder; bk. 1 (Text to phone) 33160125535651 Juvenile Fiction Checked out 11/09/2020
Bethel Public Library J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34030122870824 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Bethel Public Library J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34030128967004 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Bethel Public Library J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34030129697774 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Bethel Public Library J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34030129697782 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Bethel Public Library J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34030130868562 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Bethel Public Library J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34030130868588 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Black Rock Branch - Bridgeport J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34000076345529 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Black Rock Branch - Bridgeport J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34000080718588 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Brookfield Library J F/PALACIO (Text to phone) 34029129619184 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Brookfield Library J F/PALACIO (Text to phone) 34029138103964 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Brookfield Library TEEN F/PALACIO (Text to phone) 34029138761076 Compassion Collection Available -
Burnham Library - Bridgewater J/YA FIC PALACIO (Text to phone) 36937000596339 Juvenile Fiction Available -
C.H. Booth Library - Newtown J FIC PALACIO (Text to phone) 34014125121773 Juvenile Fiction Available -
 Series: Wonder, 1
C.H. Booth Library - Newtown J FIC PALACIO (Text to phone) 34014133727827 Juvenile Fiction Available -
 Series: Wonder, 1
C.H. Booth Library - Newtown J FIC PALACIO (Text to phone) 34014142307322 Juvenile Fiction Available -
 Series: Wonder, 1
C.H. Booth Library - Newtown J FIC PALACIO (Text to phone) 34014142307736 Juvenile Fiction Available -
 Series: Wonder, 1
C.H. Booth Library - Newtown YA FIC PALACIO (Text to phone) 34014139758669 Young Adult Fiction Available -
 Series: Wonder, 1
C.H. Booth Library - Newtown YA FIC PALACIO (Text to phone) 34014139758677 Young Adult Fiction Checked out 11/16/2020
 Series: Wonder, 1
Chester Public Library J PAL (Text to phone) 33210000297685 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Deep River Public Library J F Pala (Text to phone) 36039001148853 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Deep River Public Library YA F Pala (Text to phone) 36039142260088 Young Adult Fiction Available -
Derby Public Library JJ PAL (Text to phone) 34047121582879 Chapter Book Fiction Available -
Douglas Library - North Canaan JF PAL (Text to phone) 33490129743658 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Douglas Library of Hebron J FIC PAL (Text to phone) 33400123827498 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Douglas Library of Hebron J FIC PAL (Text to phone) 33400125655632 Juvenile Fiction Available -
East Side Branch - Bridgeport J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34000076345297 Juvenile Fiction Available -
East Side Branch - Bridgeport J PALACIO (Text to phone) 34000090052093 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Easton Public Library J PALACIO, R.J. (Text to phone) 37777129143657 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Easton Public Library J PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 37777120089768 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Easton Public Library J PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 37777122381411 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Easton Public Library J PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 37777122381429 Juvenile Fiction Checked out 10/07/2020
Easton Public Library J PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 37777124886235 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Easton Public Library J PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 37777129215695 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Easton Public Library J PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 37777129215703 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Easton Public Library J PALACIO, R. J. (Text to phone) 37777129215711 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Edith Wheeler Memorial Library - Monroe JE STORYKIT 21 (Text to phone) 34026139799345 Juvenile Themed Story Kit Available -
Edith Wheeler Memorial Library - Monroe J FIC PAL (Text to phone) 34026125718507 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Edith Wheeler Memorial Library - Monroe J FIC PAL (Text to phone) 34026132538914 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Guilford Smith Library - South Windham JF PAL (Text to phone) 34059124488822 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Gunn Memorial Library - Washington JFIC PAL (Text to phone) 34055141142368 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Gunn Memorial Library - Washington JFIC PAL (Text to phone) 34055137546572 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Hagaman Memorial Library - East Haven J PALACIO (Text to phone) 31953133833262 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Hagaman Memorial Library - East Haven YA PALACIO (Text to phone) 31953125745227 Young Adult Fiction Available -
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Record details

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.:
August Pullman was born with a facial deformity that, up until now, prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid -- but his classmates can't get past Auggie's extraordinary face. Wonder begins from Auggie's point of view, but soon switches to include his classmates, his sister, her boyfriend, and others. These perspectives converge in a portrait of one community's struggle with empathy, compassion, and acceptance.
Target Audience Note:
Middle School.
Middle School.
Subject: Schools > Fiction.
Middle schools > Fiction.
Self-acceptance > Fiction.
Abnormalities, Human > Fiction.
Brothers and sisters > Juvenile fiction.
Divorce > Juvenile fiction.
Parent and child > Juvenile fiction.
Students > Juvenile fiction.
Schools > Juvenile fiction.
Private schools > New York (State) > New York > Juvenile fiction.
Middle schools > Juvenile fiction.
Self-acceptance > Juvenile fiction.
Abnormalities, Human > Juvenile fiction.
Manhattan (New York, N.Y.) > Juvenile fiction.
Genre: Fictional Works.
Fiction.
Juvenile works.
Dust jackets (Bindings) > 2012.

Syndetic Solutions - Excerpt for ISBN Number 0605575916
Wonder
Wonder
by Palacio, R. J.
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Excerpt

Wonder

Ordinary I know I'm not an ordinary ten-year-old kid. I mean, sure, I do ordinary things. I eat ice cream. I ride my bike. I play ball. I have an XBox. Stuff like that makes me ordinary. I guess. And I feel ordinary. Inside. But I know ordinary kids don't make other ordinary kids run away screaming in playgrounds. I know ordinary kids don't get stared at wherever they go. If I found a magic lamp and I could have one wish, I would wish that I had a normal face that no one ever noticed at all. I would wish that I could walk down the street without people seeing me and then doing that look-away thing. Here's what I think: the only reason I'm not ordinary is that no one else sees me that way. But I'm kind of used to how I look by now. I know how to pretend I don't see the faces people make. We've all gotten pretty good at that sort of thing: me, Mom and Dad, Via. Actually, I take that back: Via's not so good at it. She can get really annoyed when people do something rude. Like, for instance, one time in the playground some older kids made some noises. I don't even know what the noises were exactly because I didn't hear them myself, but Via heard and she just started yelling at the kids. That's the way she is. I'm not that way. Via doesn't see me as ordinary. She says she does, but if I were ordinary, she wouldn't feel like she needs to protect me as much. And Mom and Dad don't see me as ordinary, either. They see me as extraordinary. I think the only person in the world who realizes how ordinary I am is me. My name is August, by the way. I won't describe what I look like. Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse. Why I Didn't Go to School Next week I start fifth grade. Since I've never been to a real school before, I am pretty much totally and completely petrified. People think I haven't gone to school because of the way I look, but it's not that. It's because of all the surgeries I've had. Twenty-seven since I was born. The bigger ones happened before I was even four years old, so I don't remember those. But I've had two or three surgeries every year since then (some big, some small), and because I'm little for my age, and I have some other medical mysteries that doctors never really figured out, I used to get sick a lot. That's why my parents decided it was better if I didn't go to school. I'm much stronger now, though. The last surgery I had was eight months ago, and I probably won't have to have any more for another couple of years. Mom homeschools me. She used to be a children's-book illustrator. She draws really great fairies and mermaids. Her boy stuff isn't so hot, though. She once tried to draw me a Darth Vader, but it ended up looking like some weird mushroom-shaped robot. I haven't seen her draw anything in a long time. I think she's too busy taking care of me and Via. I can't say I always wanted to go to school because that wouldn't be exactly true. What I wanted was to go to school, but only if I could be like every other kid going to school. Have lots of friends and hang out after school and stuff like that. I have a few really good friends now. Christopher is my best friend, followed by Zachary and Alex. We've known each other since we were babies. And since they've always known me the way I am, they're used to me. When we were little, we used to have playdates all the time, but then Christopher moved to Bridgeport in Connecticut. That's more than an hour away from where I live in North River Heights, which is at the top tip of Manhattan. And Zachary and Alex started going to school. It's funny: even though Christopher's the one who moved far away, I still see him more than I see Zachary and Alex. They have all these new friends now. If we bump into each other on the street, they're still nice to me, though. They always say hello. I have other friends, too, but not as good as Christopher and Zack and Alex were. For instance, Zack and Alex always invited me to their birthday parties when we were little, but Joel and Eamonn and Gabe never did. Emma invited me once, but I haven't seen her in a long time. And, of course, I always go to Christopher's birthday. Maybe I'm making too big a deal about birthday parties. How I Came to Life I like when Mom tells this story because it makes me laugh so much. It's not funny in the way a joke is funny, but when Mom tells it, Via and I just start cracking up. So when I was in my mom's stomach, no one had any idea I would come out looking the way I look. Mom had had Via four years before, and that had been such a "walk in the park" (Mom's expression) that there was no reason to run any special tests. About two months before I was born, the doctors realized there was something wrong with my face, but they didn't think it was going to be bad. They told Mom and Dad I had a cleft palate and some other stuff going on. They called it "small anomalies." There were two nurses in the delivery room the night I was born. One was very nice and sweet. The other one, Mom said, did not seem at all nice or sweet. She had very big arms and (here comes the funny part), she kept farting. Like, she'd bring Mom some ice chips, and then fart. She'd check Mom's blood pressure, and fart. Mom says it was unbelievable because the nurse never even said excuse me! Meanwhile, Mom's regular doctor wasn't on duty that night, so Mom got stuck with this cranky kid doctor she and Dad nicknamed Doogie after some old TV show or something (they didn't actually call him that to his face). But Mom says that even though everyone in the room was kind of grumpy, Dad kept making her laugh all night long. When I came out of Mom's stomach, she said the whole room got very quiet. Mom didn't even get a chance to look at me because the nice nurse immediately rushed me out of the room. Dad was in such a hurry to follow her that he dropped the video camera, which broke into a million pieces. And then Mom got very upset and tried to get out of bed to see where they were going, but the farting nurse put her very big arms on Mom to keep her down in the bed. They were practically fighting, because Mom was hysterical and the farting nurse was yelling at her to stay calm, and then they both started screaming for the doctor. But guess what? He had fainted! Right on the floor! So when the farting nurse saw that he had fainted, she started pushing him with her foot to get him to wake up, yelling at him the whole time: "What kind of doctor are you? What kind of doctor are you? Get up! Get up!" And then all of a sudden she let out the biggest, loudest, smelliest fart in the history of farts. Mom thinks it was actually the fart that finally woke the doctor up. Anyway, when Mom tells this story, she acts out all the parts--including the farting noises--and it is so, so, so, so funny! Mom says the farting nurse turned out to be a very nice woman. She stayed with Mom the whole time. Didn't leave her side even after Dad came back and the doctors told them how sick I was. Mom remembers exactly what the nurse whispered in her ear when the doctor told her I probably wouldn't live through the night: "Everyone born of God overcometh the world." And the next day, after I had lived through the night, it was that nurse who held Mom's hand when they brought her to meet me for the first time. Mom says by then they had told her all about me. She had been preparing herself for the seeing of me. But she says that when she looked down into my tiny mushed-up face for the first time, all she could see was how pretty my eyes were. Mom is beautiful, by the way. And Dad is handsome. Via is pretty. In case you were wondering. Excerpted from Wonder by R. J. Palacio All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
Search Results Showing Item 7 of 12 Preferred library: Scoville Memorial Library - Salisbury?

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